What I Eat In a Day || Banana Pumpkin Muffin Recipe

This week I take you through what I eat in a day as well as some quick banana pumpkin muffins! I was on the go during this day so I needed quick and easy meals!

Banana Pumpkin Muffins

2 1/2 overripe bananas
1 cup pumpkin puree
2 eggs
tsp baking powder
tsp sea salt
2 cups oat flour
1/4 cup apple sauce
1/4 cup almond milk
1/2 cup chocolate chips

Bake at 350 for about 12 minutes

I hope you enjoy!

HM

Advertisements

What I Eat in a Day | Pumpkin Chili Recipe

It’s been a long week but I’m back with another full day of eating! I’ve really been enjoying filming my meals. This is what I eat when I only train once during the day. I had a bit more time to make meals and make sure I’m eating enough. When I train three times it can be a bit harder. I hope you enjoy my what I eat in a day video!

My breakfast is always the same. I use half a zucchini, 1/4 a cup of oat, either banana or blueberries and then I top it with greek yogurt. I like to keep it simple and consistent with my breakfast because I train 20min after eating it.

My post workout meal was a paleo breakfast bowl that included sweet potato, spinach, kale and some scrambled eggs.

For my afternoon meal I whipped up some pumpkin pancakes using protein powder, oats, pumpkin and half a banana. These were good but the texture was a bit different.

For dinner I made a big batch of pumpkin, ground Turkey and sausage chili. My family loved it since I normally force them to eat vegetarian food.

For some quick and healthy dessert I warmed up some apples on the stove with some granola and mixed it into some plain greek yogurt. This was so good! The apples are so sweet I didn’t need to use any sweeter.

I hope you found this video helpful!

HM

What I Eat in a Day // VLOG

Over the past year I’ve lost about 25lbs. I’ve maintained strength and I sit around 11% body fat. This has taken some serious trial and error with my diet. I still have not mastered the art of eating enough but I’m getting better everyday. I’ve posted about what I eat in a day before and I thought I would try to film it this time. I’m obviously new to this but I hope you enjoy it!

Starting with my breakfast, I eat this every single day. I have 1/4 cup of oatmeal. I shred half a zucchini and a bit of carrot and mix it in. I top it with plain greek yogurt and a banana. This meal keeps me full through our long morning workouts.

Post workout I always inhale my egg omelette. I include one full egg and about 3 egg whites. I top it with hot sauce and pair it with two rice cakes and natural peanut butter. Shortly after this I have an apple because I always crave something sweet.

After this I’m on the move until 6:00pm. I have two pumpkin protein muffins in between classes at school and then some yogurt and berries on my way to train.

For dinner I had leftovers, which is pretty common for me during the week. I added some fresh veggies to make it a big more voluminous. I was craving a treat after dinner so I whipped up some chocolate quinoa. This dessert is so rich but relatively healthy.

I hope you enjoyed my first attempt at a VLOG!

HM

 

A love letter to myself before I lost the weight

Three years ago I fell in love. I found the love of my life in the first few weeks of university. I put on a few pounds of the freshman 15 combined with the carefree honeymoon stage of my relationship. I went on the pill and my weight spiralled from there. I couldn’t control my cravings and I felt like no matter what I did I kept gaining weight. I tried to give up sugar cold turkey, it worked for a month and then I would binge on sweets and I was back where I started. I was so fed up I went off the pill and after a few months I was slimming down. I was happy.

One October morning I hurt my back. Not “I slept on it wrong” I couldn’t walk. My amazing boyfriend had to lift me into the car. I couldn’t do anything for months. Naturally my weight went up. After I was back on my feet I started training  again. I’m a full time athlete on the Canadian National team. I went to training camp and my weight started going down. All of the sudden I started to love my reflection.

Next came racing season. I was more preoccupied with going fast than I was with my weight. It was as if the moment I stopped worrying about the scale the weight started to melt off. It wasn’t until I returned home from a trip to Europe that everyone started telling me how great I looked. I didn’t realize how much leaner I was until other people said it.

img_7848

This is the difference between September 2015 and July 2016. About 20lbs and 10% body fat separate these two photos.

The next photos are special to me. I love the body on the left just as much as I do the body on the right. The girl on the left worked so hard to lose 7lbs. She was just starting to feel great about herself. Her hard work was finally paying off after two years. The photo on the left I was 180lbs in April 2016 and the photo on the right is me now at 165lbs.

img_7843

To the girl who couldn’t seem to lose the weight. I love you. I love how hard you’re working even though you feel as if nothing is changing. I love that you were finally able to be honest with yourself about your nutrition. I love that now your athlete persona in your mind finally matches your body. I love that your amazing boyfriend loved you when you didn’t love yourself. I love how proud you feel and I love that you aren’t finished yet.

HM

The Ideal Body vs. The Ideal Body Image

I love the lead up to the Olympics. Every time you turn on  the TV, flip through a paper or look at a Cherrio box you are bombarded with inspiring stories of Olympians from all over the world. Every story is different but they all have one thing in common, they are positive and motivating. I love reading these stories and getting goosebumps as I watch commercials. However, one story caught my eye, an article about the struggles female athletes face when it comes to body image.

I’ve written about this before and it’s one of my favourite topics to discuss. In the spotlight we see the ripped, skinny, track stars with their amazing abs, tiny shoulders and muscular legs. You think they’re confident and proud of their amazing bodies. I can bet that they don’t always love their reflection. On the other side you have weight lifters who are heavier set and walking down the street you would have no idea that they are an Olympic level athlete. Are their skills any less impressive because they don’t have a tiny waist? No, of course not.

To paint a mental picture, I’m almost six feet tall, I have a slender but muscular build which leaves me looking like an awkward and lanky amazon woman. I am powerful, strong and I can move a boat pretty fast. I also carry my weight in my stomach and my long arms look noodlish no matter how many curls I do. In the gym I love every inch of my body and what it allows me to do, it pays the bills (in the least hooker way possible) I’m paid to make my boat go fast. So why do I spend time in the mirror looking at my stomach or feel sickeningly guilty about enjoying ice cream? Maybe it’s because I spend too much time looking at fitness models on instagram, who I know I could run circles around but they have millions of adoring fans admiring their abs. Or maybe its a coping mechanism to avoid the stress of training every day. I can’t always control my idiot coach or the weather or how sluggish I am on the water but I can control how much I eat and how I feel about my body. Some athletes find comfort in running an extra mile or staying on the water a bit longer than their teammates. For me, I take refuge in the fact that I eat healthier. I will say that my body image has improved tremendously in the last year, but I’m not at my happiest yet. That leaves me with the nagging question, is this a journey without a destination?

As I watch the Olympics at home this year, yearning to be there myself I will try to find motivation not from the amazing bodies of the women on the podium but from their impressive feats as athletes. After all, comparison is the death of joy.

HM

Coming Face to Face with a Big Goal

It’s so comforting knowing you have time. Whether its you’re training for a marathon, nationals, or you’re applying for a job. Really any time you leave your comfort zone and go after a big goal. You will eventually be looking the moment between you and achieving your goal in the eye. How do you stay calm? For me it’s national team trials. In the sport of canoe you train 6 days a week all year round for a racing season that last two months and maybe consists of 10 big races if you’re lucky. I say if you’re lucky because if you miss a stroke it can be the end of your season. How do you stay calm and steady your hands in order to give yourself the best chance to succeed? Confidence in everything you’ve done to prepare.

The moment before a race or the moment before you get the call that you got the job or made the team or the band is like christmas morning. Anything can happen, the box you’re opening could contain anything. You could be world champion or you could fall and come dead last. The key for me after racing at a world class level for 4 years is doing everything for myself. If I line up knowing I did everything in my power to be the best I can be then I can enjoy a calm moment of clarity before I race. I know that no matter what happens this is my best. Even if my best isn’t good enough there is always something to learn.

If there is one piece of advice I can give whether you’re just starting to compete or you’re struggling with defeat it’s this, there is always something to learn. It’s never going to sting as much as it does in the moments after a “failure”. Think back to the moments before the start horn, think of how proud you are of the work you put in, make a plan and get ready to attack the next competition. You know more now than you did before you started.


I hope you found this helpful whatever obstacles you may be facing! Please excuse the lack of posts in the coming weeks as I will be racing at Olympic trials!

HM

Staying True to Yourself

Staying true to yourself when trying to achieve a huge goal such as, the Olympics can be so difficult. The Olympics is the end goal for many athletes, it’s “the dream”. There have been thousands of Olympians and therefore thousands of different approaches to success. There is no formula for how to make an Olympian or world champion. If you get to the Olympics but haven’t stayed true to yourself have you really won?

The inspiration for my thoughts today came to me while I was listening to Finding Mastery  an amazing podcast about sports psychology. I fled my house here at training camp where I live with five other paddlers and went to the beach to zone out. In listening to this podcast I started to reflect on my upbringing in sport. I wasn’t raised by Olympians or star athletes. What I did have was in my opinion, more valuable. My parents were (and are) wildly supportive. They would have been cheering me on at pottery lessons if it meant I was happy and fulfilled. They put me and my brother in paddling not to make future Olympians but to keep us out of trouble in the summer. I was only four when I began my journey but at that point the journey was to catch frogs not medals.

My parents never miss a race, they follow me around the world  to cheer me on. On my home course I can only ever hear my Dad’s voice over the buzz of the crowd. They never forced me to train but they did hold me accountable. They knew if I wanted to succeed I needed to get up at 5:00am but they also knew that as a teenager I wouldn’t want to get up at 5:00am. They got me out of bed but wouldn’t fight it. However, at the dinner table I wasn’t a paddler, I was a person who paddled. It wasn’t my whole identity so we kept the paddling talk to a minimum after 5:00pm. There was never an obsession. As I get older this is more and more valuable. My ability to turn off my brain after practice and relax i owe completely to my parents. I know constantly reflecting on video and watching other athletes on their off time is a strategy of many champions. It’s not something I do and I don’t pretend to find it interesting. Does this make me less of an athlete? I seem to still be going fast without doing this and I’m way happier.

I have always been a great racer, I will have an infinite amount to write about that topic another time. For now, I’ll stay on the theme of staying true to me. I’m not the person on the start line with the laser focus. I am generally making jokes with fellow competitors or giggling to myself. I’m able to stay calm. In the tent during my warm up I’m hopping around chatting with people or even dancing. This works for me and I’ll be doing this at the Olympics if the time comes. If I’m acting like a robot on race day I wont be myself.

It’s so easy to get caught up in training camp drama but as I get older and more confident in who I am I’m finding it easier to stay authentic to myself. Sometimes that means leaving the house to do pointless stuff on the beach…

IMG_6737

I didn’t even realize how calm I was while I was doing this silly task until I was done. Find a way to bring everything back to your core values. Remember to stay true to yourself on the journey to YOUR Olympics, whatever that may be.

HM